Can I own my own top level domain?

In 2013 the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) opened up the market for new Top Level Domains (TLD) that allowed companies to register their own domain extension.

The idea being that instead of visiting mail.google.com to access your Gmail, you might instead use the address mail.google. The .com is gone – to be replaced with .google – so that Google could use domains such as search.google and calendar.google and blogger.google for their different services.

Hundreds of brands have subsequently applied to run their own TLD, including the like of Amazon, Apple, the BBC, BMW, Delta Airlines, and Microsoft – and are starting to use them for their web presence. But I was wondered if it was possible for an individual to get and run their own TLD.

Could I, for instance, apply to run the .bloomfield top level domain, and use the domain richard.bloomfield for this blog? Now that would be the ultimate vanity domain name!

I'm not sure if any individual has ever tried to apply for one. Certainly it would be pretty expensive:

  • A one-time application fee of $185,000 to apply for each TLD
  • A quarterly fee of $6,250 for maintenance
  • A per-transaction fee of $0.25 (once you go over 50,000 transactions)

And that's just the fees I would pay to ICANN. I would probably need to maintain a few servers to run my TLD and domain registry, and I'm sure there would be a few other costs involved. So unless I become a multi-millionaire, I doubt if I'll be taking control of .bloomfield any time soon.

Posted by Richard

Richard has been blogging since 2000 about technology, cycling, singing, and life in general. Follow him on Twitter.

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