Migrating my WordPress blog to SiteGround

I was looking around for a different web hosting company, and decided to give SiteGround a try, because they seem to have a good quality service at a reasonable price.

I signed up for their GrowBig hosting plan that allows you to host multiple domains/sites on one account, and also fully supports the Let's Encrypt free SSL service

Google are keen for the whole of the web to be encrypted. They announced a few years ago that they started to boost web pages in their search results that are hosted on secure sites, and also that later this year the Chrome browser will highlight "Not Secure" web sites.

I had already played around with installing an SSL certificate for my richardbloomfield.com site, but SSL certs can be expensive to buy and maintain, and my old host would only allow me to install one cert on my shared hosting account – so I could only secure one of my domains.

To perform the migration of my WordPress blog between hosts, I followed the instructions on this page:

How to Move WordPress to a New Host or Server With No Downtime

It uses a plugin called Duplicator that does all the heavy lifting of creating a complete backup of your existing site – including the WordPress database (that stores all your posts, pages, comments, and settings), and all the WordPress files (the WordPress software itself plus any themes and plugins you've installed).

The blog installed without any problems on my new hosting account, and I was left with an exact copy of my old WordPress installation.

Then all that was left was to log into the SiteGround control panel and enable the Let's Encrypt SSL for that domain with a couple of clicks, and I was all set.

I also installed the SG Optimizer plugin that allows me to make use of the SiteGround dynamic web cache (which really speeds up my web site) and allows for a one-click option to force all blog traffic over the HTTPS secure connection.

Gmail two-factor authentication

It's interesting that Google had revealed that fewer than 10% of people using Gmail have two-factor authentication active on their account. Most people are relying on just their password to protect them!

So why should anyone be worried about their email getting hacked? A lot of people might say that their email doesn't contain anything of particular value to worry about – but they forget that your email is often the access key to every other service you use online.

Think about all the forgotten password reset forms you've ever filled in. Most of the time, all they require is for you to enter your email address, and then click on a link in the subsequent email they send you.

So, if I have access to your email account, I can start accessing all your accounts: all your social media accounts, all your online utility accounts, and maybe even some of your bank/financial accounts. I can certainly find out a lot of information about you that I could use for identity fraud.

I also have full access to all your contacts, and can approach them, pretending to be you, and try and scam them out of money or information.

So I'd certainly recommend that your email account should be the most secure account you have online – precisely because its the gateway to all your other accounts.

So what is two-factor authentication then?

Two-factor authentication requires you to enter two pieces of information to access your account. The first authentication is your password, and the second is typically something like a 4 or 6 digit code sent via SMS to your phone.

With two-factor authentication enabled, you need to have access to both your password and a physical device (your mobile/cell phone) to access your account. And so it makes it a lot harder for someone to hack into your account.

Google makes it even easier to use, in that it offers alternatives to the typical SMS code sent to your phone. You can do your second authentication by using any of these methods:

  • clicking a button on your phone
  • running an authentication code app (useful if you don't have signal to receive an SMS)
  • receiving an automated voice call to your mobile or landline
  • storing a security code on a USB stick
  • having a printed list of codes

And once you have authenticated yourself on a particular computer or device you often don't need to re-authenticate yourself for a month or more – and so it's not that big a hassle.

And to enable it, all you have to do is visit the Google 2-Step Verification site and turn it on. It takes only a few minutes, and could go a long way to securing yourself online.

What about other services?

You can enabled two-factor authentication on all major sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn. Your bank probably forces you to use it, or has some additional security steps to try and protect your account.

And you can visit the site Two Factor Auth to find out what online services you use have it available.

Why I won’t by buying the Nexus 6

I’ve been a fan of the Google Nexus phones for a couple of years, and have written in the past about getting my hands on a Nexus 4 and a Nexus 5 before they were available in Ireland. And like of lot of other fans, I was quite excited to learn what was coming next.

The major attraction of the Nexus mobiles is that you were able to get a top-performing phone at a discount price, but with the new Nexus 6 announced yesterday, you’re still getting a top-performing phone but it’s now got a premium price tag attached. And, let’s face it, the screen is way too big!

With the Nexus 6, they have deviated from a winning formula, and potentially upset a lot of fans.  The whole point of getting a Nexus 4 or Nexus 5 was that you could ditch those expensive mobile contracts, buy a reasonably-priced smartphone SIM-free for about €350, and save a fortune over the life of a phone.  The Nexus 6 price is more likely to be cost €650 SIM-free in Ireland – almost double.

It’s interesting that Google still intends to keep selling the Nexus 5, which is still a strongly performing phone, even if it is a year old now. It understands that a lot of people are not interested in the ‘phablet’ sized Nexus 6, and so have kept the Nexus 5 available for sale.

But here’s the thing… I’m an early adopter of technology, and I like to feel that I have the ‘latest and greatest’ technology, and have got used to replacing my mobile every year. But at the moment, I have no upgrade path. I have no motivation to put my hand in my pocket and hand over some money.

So for now, it seems I’ll be keeping hold of my Nexus 5 – which will probably come as bad news to my wife, who had plans to take it off me once I upgraded.

Ordering the Google Nexus 5 in Ireland

Update 19/03/2014: The Nexus 5 and 7 are now available to purchase SIM-free direct from the Google Play Store in Ireland. The Nexus 5 is also available as part of a contract from Three Ireland and Meteor.

I’ve written about how I’ve ordered the Nexus 4 in the past, and a few minutes after the Nexus 5 was released to the public today I had already ordered one for myself, and I thought I’d share how I did it:

  1. To access the Google Play store to order the phone you need to appear as if you’re in the UK. For this you need to use a VPN or Proxy service. I use VPNUK to access the play store, and they have a 7-day free trial if you want to give them a go – but any similar service will do – lots of other people seem to use “Tunnel Bear”.  If you already have an active Google account, you may need to use the privacy/incognito mode of your browser, as sometimes the Google browser cookies will continue to identify you as being in Ireland even when you use the VPN.
  2. Have a UK delivery address ready to use.  I use Parcel Motel for this, and you can use their Northern Ireland address for delivery – more info on using Parcel Motel.
  3. You need to have a credit/debit card that is registered to a valid UK address, but it doesn’t have to be the same address as you’re using for delivery. I’ve heard of people that re-register their Irish credit card with a UK address, use PayPal, or use a UK prepaid credit card, but I can’t comment on whether any of those work.

The Nexus 5 is available in both Black and White, and is priced at £299 for the 16GB model and £339 model – and both come pre-loaded with the latest version 4.4 (KitKat) of Android.

My Google Nexus 5 - just arrived today!
My Google Nexus 5 – just arrived today!