SiteGround web hosting Black Friday sale

I got a notification today that SiteGround, the web hosting company that I use to host all my sites, are having a Black Friday sale with discounts of up to 75% off their hosting plans.

The discounts apply to their shared hosting plans, and are available from Friday 23rd to Monday 26th November 2018 inclusive, and might be worth looking at if you’re in the market for new web hosting.

I’ve been with them since February this year and have been very happy with their service – in particular the way they optimise performance of WordPress websites. My sites load so much more quickly than they did with my old host, and the integration with free SSL cert provider Let’s Encrypt is also welcome.

As a caveat, I would say that SiteGround already heavily discount their hosting plans all year round. Their standard discounts tend to be around the 65% mark, and so this Black Friday sale has to be seen in that context.

To make the most of this discount you need to consider if you can afford to prepay for your hosting for a number of years. If you are willing to pay for 2 or 3 years in advance, you will pay the discounted price for the whole of that period. But at the end of the discount period you go back to paying full price, which can be a big price jump.

For example, the GrowBig plan at present is charged at £14.95 per month. It’s currently discounted by 66% to £4.95 per month. Presumably during the Black Friday sale, that price after the 75% discount will be even lower such as around £3.75 per month. If you signed up for 1 year, you’d be paying 12 x 3.75 plus VAT (at 23% in Ireland) which is a total of £55.35 (approx €64).

However after the discount period, to stay on the same plan would cost you £220.66 (approx €253) at full price for the next year. That’s quite a hike, so it’s worth bearing this in mind before you sign up – particularly if you don’t relish the prospect of moving hosting providers again next year.

This isn’t the greatest sales pitch, but I prefer to be honest and up-front with people so that they are going into something with their eyes open. And along those lines I’d also like to declare that by clicking on any link to SiteGround in this post has the potential to earn me referral income. 

6 Ways to Improve the Performance of your WordPress Blog

How fast does your WordPress blog load? Have you tested performance on mobile as well as desktop? Did you know that performance is one of metrics that Google uses to rank sites?

When talking about performance its important to remember that around half of all traffic these days comes from mobile devices, and these devices can often be on limited data connections. So when you look at site performance (as with web design these days) you should adopt a mobile-first strategy.

I used a tool https://testmysite.withgoogle.com/ to check on the performance of my WordPress blog, and it reported that my site takes 7 seconds to load over a 3G connection – which apparently results in me losing a quarter of visitors that simply give up before the site ever loads!

Google has a goal that its sites should all load within half a second. That level of performance might not be achievable for everyone, but we can all do better.

So how do you optimise your WordPress site to load more quickly?

1. Keep pages small

A testing tool like GTmetrix can tell you how fast your page loads, and how big your page is. If you are loading lots of images, videos and scripts, then the size of your site could be huge – and therefore slow – without you realising it.

My site comes in at just over 1MB which is actually pretty good. If yours is more in the range of 3-5MB (or even more!) then you need to start thinking about page size.

Reduce the number of posts displayed on your page. Do you really need to show 10 posts at a time? I have my site set to only show 5 posts at a time, and by halving the number of posts I also halve the page size!

Also think about whether you need all the content served from 3rd-party sites, such as Facebook or Twitter, that could be slowing down your site.

2. Minify your code

Use code minifying plugins such as Autoptimize to reduce the size of your HTML, javascript and CSS files by removing all unnecessary space in the source code. It won’t have any effect on the way your page looks, but it will reduce the size of the files being served.

3. Optimise images

A picture paints a thousand words, but it can also slow you down!

Loading lots of large images can be one of the primary causes of poor site performance. So consider the number and size of any images you display. Obviously for a photographer’s portfolio site you’re going to need to show large high-quality images – but you don’t need to show them all on one page.

Use a plugin such as Smush to automatically optimise images as you upload them to your site. It will reduce the file size of your images without losing any of the quality.

4. Eliminate unnecessary plugins

It’s tempting to keep installing more and more plugins to help add new features to a site – but every time you add a new plugin, it’s more code for WordPress to have to run before it can render your site. So have a clear out and get rid of any plugins you don’t need.

It’s also a good idea to minimise the number of plugins and themes you have installed for site security. The more plugins and themes from different authors you have installed, the higher the potential sources of vulnerability to hacking.

5. Select your hosting account carefully

Not all hosting providers are the same, and although most will allow you to run WordPress from your account the performance of sites can vary wildly from one host to another.

If you’re shopping around, look at hosts that have specific WordPress optimised hosting. I like SiteGround as they have optimised their hosting to serve WordPress sites as fast as possible.

And if you’re getting a lot of traffic to your site, then ditch the shared hosting and get your own virtual or cloud server. It will give you a lot more resources to serve a lot more people at once.

6. Upgrade PHP

PHP is the programming language that WordPress runs on, and many hosting providers use an older version of it by default. However if your host allows you to upgrade to a newer version (or they can do it for you) then your site will get a good performance boost.

When upgrading from PHP 5.6 to version 7, WordPress performance doubles!

Source: http://www.zend.com/en/resources/php7_infographic

Migrating my WordPress blog to SiteGround

I was looking around for a different web hosting company, and decided to give SiteGround a try, because they seem to have a good quality service at a reasonable price.

I signed up for their GrowBig hosting plan that allows you to host multiple domains/sites on one account, and also fully supports the Let's Encrypt free SSL service

Google are keen for the whole of the web to be encrypted. They announced a few years ago that they started to boost web pages in their search results that are hosted on secure sites, and also that later this year the Chrome browser will highlight "Not Secure" web sites.

I had already played around with installing an SSL certificate for my richardbloomfield.com site, but SSL certs can be expensive to buy and maintain, and my old host would only allow me to install one cert on my shared hosting account – so I could only secure one of my domains.

To perform the migration of my WordPress blog between hosts, I followed the instructions on this page:

How to Move WordPress to a New Host or Server With No Downtime

It uses a plugin called Duplicator that does all the heavy lifting of creating a complete backup of your existing site – including the WordPress database (that stores all your posts, pages, comments, and settings), and all the WordPress files (the WordPress software itself plus any themes and plugins you've installed).

The blog installed without any problems on my new hosting account, and I was left with an exact copy of my old WordPress installation.

Then all that was left was to log into the SiteGround control panel and enable the Let's Encrypt SSL for that domain with a couple of clicks, and I was all set.

I also installed the SG Optimizer plugin that allows me to make use of the SiteGround dynamic web cache (which really speeds up my web site) and allows for a one-click option to force all blog traffic over the HTTPS secure connection.

This is a permanent error

I just discovered that, because of some changes I made to my accounts a few days ago, a lot of my incoming email has been bouncing over the weekend.

Due to an undocumented ‘feature’ of my domain host, I had somehow managed to set a couple of email addresses to forward in a perpetual loop to themselves; never quite making it as far as the mailbox.

Oh well, the error has now been corrected, and hopefully I didn’t miss anything too important.

In accordance with the 2011 European Union directive designed to protect your online privacy, I am required by law to check you consent to the use of cookies on this web site. Click on "Accept" to grant that consent. Click for more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close